Many concepts look obvious because they are used often, not because they are really simple.

Small quantities that we encounter all the time in most projects, such as date, time, price, quantity of items, a min and a max… hardly are a subject of interest from developers « as it is obvious that we can represent them with primitives ».

Yes you can, but you should not.

I have experienced through different projects that every decision to use a new value value object or to improve an existing value object, even very small and trivial, was probably the design decision that yields the most benefit in every further development, maintenance or evolution. This comes from the simple fact that using something simpler « all the time » just makes our life simpler all the time.

We often dont pay attention to the usual chair, however it was carefully designed.

We often dont pay attention to the usual chair, however it was carefully designed.

As a reminder, value objects are objects with an identity solely defined by their data. Using value objects brings many typical benefits of Object Orientation, such as:

  1. One value object often gathers several primitives together, and one thing is always simpler that a few things
  2. The value object can be fully unit-tested: this gives a tremendous return, because once it is trusted there will simply be no bug about it any more
  3. Methods that encapsulate even the simplest expression with a good name tells exactly what it does, instead of having to interpret the expression every time (think of isEmpty() instead of « size() == 0″, it does save some time each time)
  4. The value object is a place to put documentation such as the corresponding unit and other conventions, and have them enforced. Static creators makes creation easy, self-explanatory, can enforce the validations and help select the right unit (percent, meter, currency)
  5. The method toString() can just tell in a pretty-formatted fashion what it is, and this is precious!
  6. The value object can also define various abilities, such as being Comparable, being immutable, be reused in a Flyweight fashion etc.

And of course, when needed it can be changed to evolve, without breaking the code using it. I could not imagine a team claiming to be really agile without the ability at least to evolve its most basic concepts in an easy way.

The first time it takes some extra time to build a value object, as opposed to jumping to a few primitives; but being lazy actually means doing less in the long run, not just right now.

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2 Responses to “Design your value objects carefully and your life will get better!”

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