How I became enthusiastic about patterns

In my very first job, I  was doing R&D, working on a map-matching algorithm. The goal of this algorithm was to pinpoint a moving car on a vector map, based on the data from various sensors, including a GPS, an electronic compass and the car odometer. Such algorithm was essential for the business of the company, and there was very little literature on the subject.

The R&D challenge

At school I had been taught some C programming, so I started doing the algorithm in plain C code. One special case after another, the code began to grow until it became quite complicated. I had a specially equipped car with a computer and all the gear in it to do real testing on the roads around the office, from the highway to forest road, city streets or even car parks, and this was fun! But situation after situation, I had to make the code more and more complicated. At some point, it became obvious to me that the mode of implementation (plain C code) had become the main obstacle for improving the algorithm. It was becoming increasingly difficult to grow the sophistication in a mess of structured code.

My early mentors

Yes savoir-faire can be found in books (but not only)
Yes savoir-faire can be found in books (but not only)

At the same time I was willing to progress, so I was getting closer to the few very experienced colleagues. Our company was a startup in 2000, and there were many more junior developers than senior ones. At first, I thought UML could help me (it did not indeed) so I started asking questions about UML. When I became more comfortable with UML, a senior colleague told me I should now have a look at design patterns, starting with the Composite. So I took the GoF book on my desk and began to look at it as a reference to get design ideas during the day. I also borrowed the pattern pattern book from Mark Grand and read it in the train.

And then it has been “Wow patterns are a great way of transfering knowledge!”. I remember reading the pattern “Cache” in the book. It was not in itself a very innovative design idea, but I understood that the pattern format was ideal to document just any idea. I hate long explanations in long books, and the pattern format, which tends to be short and structured, is perfect for quick scanning whenever you’re looking for ideas. Even when I didn’t find a pattern for my case, I found it stimulating to read other people ideas.

Enthusiasm and success as a result

I started to apply the State and the Strategy patterns into the map-matching algorithm and this made it much, much simpler. It actually made it so much simpler that we were now able (the team was growing at that time) to go an order of magnitude further in sophistication, while being perfectly in control of the code. The introduction of two simple design patterns had suddenly given a really big advantage to a piece of code essential to the company! This is how I became enthusiastic about patterns.

The reality

I am also enthusiastic about deserts.
I am also enthusiastic about deserts.

What actually happened is that reading and starting to play with patterns just taught me object-oriented programming. Patterns acted like examples of good design, until the underlying principles became natural. Later I discovered the SOLID principles of Robert C. Martin, and recognized the principles behind many design patterns. In my next job experiences I took the habit to look for patterns for whatever problem I was encountering, and to my surprise, I found out that most common problems were already being taken care of in the form of analysis patterns or other kinds of patterns! To give the most obvious example, Martin Fowler “Things that change with time” is really a must-read, which you can apply easily to solve your problem.

Conclusion

This is how I became enthusiastic about pattern, not just design patterns but every kind of patterns, from analysis patterns to domain driven design patterns, enterprise integration patterns, PLoP patterns and many patterns from various authors. I know my enthusiasm is a bit exaggerated, a bit like the souvenir of a first love that cannot be much objective. Fortunately I quickly learnt when not to use patterns, to keep things as possible as they can be, and to do unit testing. By the way the benefits of unit tests also struck me when I started with them, but not as much as patterns, there can be only one first time, and my first first time was with patterns, not unit tests!

cyrille

Software development, Domain-Driven Design, patterns and agile principles enthusiast