Patterns express intents

Patterns represent a couple (intent, solution); sometime they refer to a solution, more often they essentially represents an intent, independently of its solution.

Sometimes the solution part of patterns includes a trick or a workaround to overcome the limits of a language, but patterns cannot be reduced to that trick. Indeed, a very important role of patterns (not only design patterns but patterns in general ) is that they represent stereotypes of intents.

A matter of intent

Therefore, it does not really matter if the Strategy pattern can be expressed using a Java interface, a C++ functor or a first-class function: it remains a Strategy because this is just what we want: “Strategy lets the algorithm vary independently from clients that use it“.

Is the intent of this book holder clear?
Is the intent of this book holder clear?

Another similar pattern is the Command pattern, which intent is:” Encapsulate a request as an object, thereby letting you parameterize clients with different requests, queue or log requests, and support undoable operations.” Here the intent talks about ‘object’ because it was written for an object-oriented context, however it can easily be made generic if you think ‘handle on function’ (or closure etc.) instead of object. Again, even if first class functions such as delegates in C# can achieve this goal, they do not replace the need to declare the precise intent: “you want to parameterize clients with different requests, queue or log requests, and support undoable operations.”  So in some sense, just using a functor without declaring that the intent is to do a Strategy or a Command is like using untyped variables: you are supposed to know what you are doing, but it is implicit.*

Yet another example with the Visitor pattern and its intent: “Represent an operation to be performed on the elements of an object structure. Visitor lets you define a new operation without changing the classes of the elements on which it operates.” This is typically achieved through double-dispatch in languages lacking multimethods, but regardless of how it is implemented the intent remains, and this is what matters most.

Generic Vs. specialized intents

For example, the intent of the generic Proxy pattern defined in a paper from James Noble:

The Proxy pattern is used to “Provide a surrogate or placeholder for another object the Subject to control access to it”. A Proxy object provides the same interface as the original Subject object, but intercepts any messages directed to the Subject. A Proxy object can therefore be used in place of the Subject by a client which is designed to access the Subject, without the client being aware the Subject has been replaced by a Proxy.

This intent can then be specialized for various purposes, leading to several specialized patterns:

What's your intent if you buy that? (yes this is brand new furniture for sale)
What's your intent if you buy that? (yes this is brand new furniture for sale)
  • Remote Proxy: provides a local representative to an object that is only available on a remote machine
  • Protection Proxy: checks the access rights before directing to the original object
  • Virtual Proxy: creates expensive object only on demand so that they are created only when necessary
  • Cache Proxy: an object representative that remembers the result of calling the methods of an object to avoid directing subsequent call again to this object
  • Counter Proxy (smart pointer management), etc.

We say that these patterns are specializations of the Proxy pattern. The main Proxy pattern introduces the common solution—providing a placeholder for an object. Every specialized proxy pattern is a special kind of Proxy: A “Protection Proxy” is a special kind of “Proxy”. The specialization here only deals with the Intent part of the patterns.


Now that functional languages are getting more attention, it becomes fashionable to question the usefulness of patterns: “Scala does that without the need for patterns”. I agree Scala is great, I disagree this argument. Patterns are first of all signs to denote intents, even if they can do more.


Patterns as Signs, James Noble and Robert Biddle, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Classifying Relationships Between Object-Oriented Design Patterns, James Noble, Microsoft Research Institute, Macquarie University

* By the way, how to achieve “undoable operations” by using first class functions in an elegant way? this would require passing two functions always together: do() and undo()


Software development, Domain-Driven Design, patterns and agile principles enthusiast