Just like many arts, music arousal is considered to follow the well-known Wundt curve that defines the balance between attractiveness and boredom. Too much repetition is boring, not enough repetition is confusing and considered just noise.

What for?

Let us assert that idea to music, to generate rhythms. A very simple application of the Wundt curve principle is to consider one given rhythmic pattern (e-g. , « x.x.xx.. ») then to build up a more elaborate polyrhythm by combining various repetitions of it, although each copy must be distorted a bit to make the combination more complex hence more attractive. In other word, given a rhythmic seed, make it grow a rhythmic tree.

The transforms to apply to the rhythmic patterns can be linear:

  • Reverse (« ..xx.x.x »)
  • Roll (« x.x.xx.. »)
  • Scale 2:1 (« x…x…x.x….. ») or 1:2 (« xxx. »)

or non-linear:

  • Truncate (« xx.. »)
  • Switch timbre (not really a transform, just to put somewhere)

In practice

To put that into practice I have been trying simple Java programs long ago, but it was too slow a process, and since I did not build a genetic algorithm around it was driven at random.

To make it more fun to investigate, we have started a small project of building an instrument to program rhythms on using laser beams and small reflectors. Each reflector triggers a sound (on a MIDI controlled MPC500) when hit by a laser beam (you need the sound on to listen to the Clap sound being triggered):

Playing with the beams to create very simple rythms from cyrille martraire on Vimeo.

The Arduino board

The Arduino board

Then by having several reflectors linked to each other to make patterns, we expect to be able to program rhythms by moving reflectors sets in the playground, using its geometry to derive the transformations to apply to the patterns.

EDIT: here is another video after some progress:

Playing with dual beams for kick and clap beat from cyrille martraire on Vimeo.

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One Response to “Playing with laser beams to create very simple rhythms”

  1. [...] finally received ten retroreflectors, the experiments started in “Playing with laser beams to create very simple rhythms”, we can now move [...]